Saturday, 25 August 2018

Transport and Accessibility and Older People

Transport and Accessibility and Older People

Join us for the next in our series of conferences and focus groups

Wednesday 12 September 2018

Europe House, 32 Smith Square, SW1P 3EU

Join Positive Ageing in London for the next in a series of successful conferences and focus groups, on issues affecting older Londoners. This free, half-day conference will focus on Transport and Accessibility and Older People.
The event is being held in partnership with Age Platform Europe (UK branch) at Europe House starting at 11.00am and finishing 3.30pm on Wednesday 12 September. Registration, tea, coffee and biscuits will be from 10.30am. There will also be a lunch buffet provided.
Transport and the wider issue of accessibility for older Londoners has been, and remains, a key issue for older people. Our expert speakers on this subject include:
  • Frances McAndrew, Transport for London will be talking about design for the mind, and the new TfL approach to ensuring future travel arrangements, systems and new technology have integrated and inclusive design built into them, and is keen to hear of new ideas that can be incorporated into this design model.
  • Peter Rayner FCILT, Age Platform Europe will be talking on the subject of Independent Mobility – Use it or Lose it. What do Older People need to be able to self determine. Common Problems and Best Practice. A European and UK Perspective.
  • Rosie McKearney, Age UK will be talking about their campaigns for age friendly community transport and alternatives to privatised rail and bus services.
  • Matt Winfield, SusTrans will be talking about alternatives which are inclusive and environmental.
Most importantly there will be ample opportunity to be part of a wider discussion and focus group which will produce agreed common recommendations and concerns to be sent to those who hold senior positions within London transport. Your individual and collective feedback and input of new ideas will be a key part of this conference and focus groups.
We welcome people from across London, from all the different and diverse groups which make up older Londoners, as well as experts who work on behalf of inclusivity and older people.
We do hope you can come and look forward to seeing you.
This is an open meeting and please send this invite onto others who may be interested.
TimeTopicSpeaker
10.30Arrival and Registration
11.00Introduction and overviewChris Walsh – Chair of PAiL and Age Platform (UK Branch)
13.00Lunch and Networking
14.15Focus groups on key issues
14.55Tea/Coffee Break
15.30Finish

London joins the WHO Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities

London joins the WHO Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities

Published on 15 June 2018 12:01 PM
The Deputy Mayor for Social Integration, Social Mobility and Community Engagement, Matthew Ryder, QC, today revealed that London has signed up to the World Health Organisation’s Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities.
Speaking at Age UK London’s “Tackling Loneliness Amongst Older Londoners” Conference, Matthew outlined the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan’s aim for London to be recognised globally as an age-friendly city. 
Matthew Ryder, QC, Deputy Mayor for Social Integration, Social Mobility and Community Engagement, said: 
“We’re very excited to be joining the WHO Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities. The Mayor’s vision is for London to be a place where people of all ages can thrive. Older Londoners make an extremely valuable contribution to city life - as professionals, volunteers and carers. We want to encourage all Londoners to participate actively in community activities and to treat everyone with respect, regardless of their age. We look forward to working with other age-friendly cities and communities in the UK and across the world.”
The World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Network for Age-friendly Cities and Communities (the Network) was established to foster the exchange of experience and mutual learning between cities and communities worldwide. All members of the network display the desire and commitment to promote healthy and active ageing and a good quality of life for their older residents.
Key actions the Mayor has already committed to include reducing barriers to decent jobs for older workers, reducing digital exclusion, providing more accessible and adaptable homes, and ensuring sports and arts and the transport system across the city are inclusive and responsive to the needs of older people.
Paul Goulden, CEO of Age UK London, said: 
“We’re so pleased that the Mayor has signed up to the WHO Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities. This is a real step forward to make sure that older Londoners can enjoy everything that London has to offer. We look forward to working with the Mayor to help all of London to love later life.”
Anna Dixon, the Chief Executive of the Centre for Ageing Better, which convenes the UK Network of Age-friendly Communities, commented:
“Ensuring that everyone can make the most of living longer and enjoy lives spent in good health, good work and good housing must be a collective endeavour.
“It will require local leadership, which is why it is so great to see London commit to becoming a more inclusive city for people of all ages and abilities by committing to becoming an age-friendly city.”